Sunday, June 21, 2015

The Art of Architectural Photography June-21-2015

Few experiences can be as aesthetically captivating as entering a place of worship, to say nothing of the religious engagement.  The hushed and holey atmosphere, which is suffused with a light that orchestrates an emotional association to worship and faith, provides many sensory experiences.  The shafts and swirls of light, often rich textures, ornamentation (or lack of it), frequently musty aromas, enveloping sense of sacredness and muffled sounds in these places: churches, synagogues, mosques, shrines are carefully architected to create uniquely particular feelings for the visitor.

Throughout time, the clergy, architects, builders, engineers and designers sought to use light to enhance, emphasize and define space.  Religious structures particularly were infused with a mysterious smokey light or luminously falling shafts of light that illuminated and emphasized the sacred areas and articles of worship.  Whether light played over prayer books, the statuary, images or the alter itself, light has always been channeled as a vehicle for messages from above.  The Incas constructed Machu Pitchu to receive a single shaft of light just once a year, as well as to burnish the entrances to what historians believe to be Inca holey places.  Gothic Churches were designed so that the devine light poured into the nave of the church to illuminate the way to the alter.  However the light was transmitted, it added enormously to the religious experience.  

Light has many uses and allures.  Employing light to augment religious experiences creates wonder, great beauty and an impact possibly like no other.

Sepia Architectural Photography

To learn more about light and religious structures visit:

Saturday, June 13, 2015

The Art of Architectural Photography 6-13-2015

Serendipity is marvelous!  Just when you think you are never going to find something new, there IT IS.....staring at you through your lens!

On a recent trip to latest NYC "hot spot," Long Island City, I was thrilled to see the skyline in a fresh way.  We parked on an upper floor of a municipal lot for a night on the town, Queens style.  Through the gaps in the concrete structure of the parking lot, I saw Oz: my personal interpretation of Manhattan.  I was transfixed by the sight of the stunning view of Manhattan bathed in lights.  Night lights are always alluring and this jewel-like presentation is no exception.

When ever I leave my house, a point and shoot camera is in my bag or pocket.  That way, when serendipity calls, I'm ready!

Black and White Architectural Photography

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Sunday, June 7, 2015

The Art of Architectural Photography 6-7-2015

I am fascinated with and inspired by light in any form.  And, as usual, my insights into light and its many configurations have a way of presenting when I am not looking for comprehension.  I came across a wonderfully profound aspect of light in an odd but familiar context quite by chance. When I was in college, I took a geology course.  One of the classes took place in a cave (!!) where we looked at natural rock formations.  The cave was very dim and our professor eschewed flashlights in favor of studying the rocky surfaces and outcroppings au natural.  It was OK but on that field trip an incident occurred that changed my perception about seeing and understanding all that is visual.  There was a hole in the top of the cave and for some reason I looked up just as a drop of water, gilded with light fell through the gloom.  It enchants me still, thinking of that single beam of golden light descending through the dim cave.  All at once I could fathom the glorification of light by the ancients.  Comprehend the beauty of natural light in its many guises.  The experience reinforced my desire to use light as the most pervasive element in my work.

While natural light is sublime, electric and other artificial light sources have their charm and value.  Often old electric fixtures can create unusual or even unique lighting scenarios.  This hallway graced by magnificent and imposing old chandeliers offers light that casts wonderful pools and shadows.  The "noise" prompted by the darkness and the artificial rays is fog like and gives an aura of mystery.  That, coupled with the antique furnishings gives a time-travel-to-another-age feeling to me.  Light can transport as well as illuminate.

Sepia Architectural Photography

To learn more about the properties of light visit:

Monday, June 1, 2015

The Art of Architectural Photography 6-1-2015

I am pleased and honored to be the subject of an article by renowned Interior Designer and Art Consultant Richard Rabel, whose knowledge of art and design I greatly admire.  Thank you, Richard!

Black and White Architectural Photography: Bronx, NY