Saturday, May 3, 2014

The Art of Architectural Photography 5-2-2014

In all of us there is a bit of the voyeur, in the sense that we love the unique and intriguing experience of seeing things indirectly. The idea of viewing the subject through another dimension is enormously appealing.  It is the essence of movies, literature, and other arts: we observe vicariously or second hand.  Photographers, especially, like to look through the the camera lens and see their subjects "in" the camera so to speak.

The concept of looking at something via the imagination is even more appealing and is an extension of voyeurism.  The American painter, Edward Hopper enthralls us with his paintings that invite the viewer to come inside a window or door.  The Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico, whose works that take the eye through arches and around corners,  was a student of the philosopher Nietzsche who said:
"Art is not merely the imitation of the reality of nature, but in truth a metaphysical supplement to the reality of nature, placed alongside thereof for its conquest."  In other words, art surpasses reality in its presentation of the artist's conceptualization.

Both Hopper and Chirico involve the viewer in seeing through one component into the next and further, as did Alfred Hitchcock in the film Rear Window.  These caused me to realize the importance of adding the appearance of  beyond in my photography.  Doorways, portals, arches, windows are pathways to journeys of inventiveness.


Black and White architectural photograph: Munich, Germany.


To learn more about seeing through and beyond visit:
lhttp://www.alfredhitchcockgeek.com/2009/11/alfred-hitchcock-and-art-edward-hopper.html

http://www.doubledialogues.com/archive/issue_twelve/walker.html


 http://www.slate.com/blogs/behold/2014/02/26/photos_document_paris_modernization_in_the_exhibition_charles_marville_photographer.html
Art is not merely an imitation of the reality of nature, but in truth a metaphysical supplement to the reality of nature, placed alongside thereof for its conquest.

Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/f/friedrichn159174.html#2lQfkWYebltiHH3s.99



2 comments:

  1. Well said Ellen. The idea of seeing "into" the image is very compelling. You have articulated something that is innate in all of us, the desire to see more. Some might call it framing the subject but here you have shown us that it is the anticipation of discovery that fuels our imagination too.

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  2. As we discover we also learn to appreciate more. Your photography, Nick, continues to inspire me and to fuel my imagination!

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